“No more interconnection fees for domestic calls and text messages for mobile phone subscribers. And, more importantly, mobile phone subscribers can now change telco providers without losing their original number. This is a victory for all mobile phone subscribers.”

This was according to Quezon City 2nd District Rep. Winnie Castelo, as he welcomed the signing into law of Republic Act 11202 or the Mobile Number Portability (MNP) Act––a new law that allows mobile phone subscribers to retain their mobile numbers even if they decide to switch telco providers.

“This law would give subscribers the freedom to choose their desired telco providers and, as a consequence, will encourage competition among the country’s telecommunications companies, and therefore offering much better services for their customers,” said Castelo who is a candidate for Quezon City councilor in 2019, a post he previously held for four terms, from 1995-2001 and from 2004-2010.

“The inconvenience of losing a number that one has been using for a long time is what discourages many mobile phone users from switching telco companies when they are unsatisfied with the telco’s services,” added Castelo.

“The inconvenience of losing a number that one has been using for a long time is what discourages many mobile phone users from switching telco companies.” 

“This MNP Act has removed this inconvenience, and in its place has provided the subscriber with the power of choice, because the consumer can now switch without changing numbers,” exclaimed Castelo.

Under the same MNP Act, postpaid or prepaid subscribers without financial obligations to their current telco provider can retain their mobile phone number by submitting a porting application, which their telco company is required to process. Once the original telco company has notified the new telco provider, the latter has 24 hours to activate the mobile phone user’s account.

Telco providers that refuse to provide this service can be fined from 10 thousand pesos up to one million pesos, as well as revocation of the telco’s franchise.

“This MNP Act has removed this inconvenience, and in its place has provided the subscriber with the power of choice.”

“This is a very good development, especially in light of the upcoming entry of a third telco. Expectedly, services will become better, or else the weaker telco will lose all or most of its subscribers,” concluded Castelo.

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