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‘ODETTE’-HIT SCHOOLS TO GET IMMEDIATE AID – DEPED

Education Secretary Leonor Briones assured the public that the Department of Education (DepEd) is assisting damaged schools throughout the country in the aftermath of Typhoon Odette.

Briones, who was at Negros Oriental when the typhoon made landfall, noted that the agency is coordinating with the Regional Offices for the initial assessment and assistance needed by schools, teachers, and learners.

“Each time there is a natural disaster, we make sure we immediately connect them to other agencies while the responsible agency undertakes the necessary assistance.”

“I saw the extent of the damage. Each time there is a natural disaster, we make sure we immediately connect them to other agencies while the responsible agency undertakes the necessary assistance,” the education chief stressed.

“We are not in any way deterred by the natural calamity which has just occurred, and we always survive. We stand up again, and I speak not only for Region VII, but all the other regions,” the education chief added.

Meanwhile, DepEd-Region VII Director Salustiano Jimenez reported an estimated P150-million worth of damages in Central Visayas schools, according to the transmitted report of selected Schools Division Offices. Some field offices were not able to provide an assessment due to weak internet connection.

Jimenez also pointed out that 52 classrooms from 12 schools were severely damaged while 41 schools were partially affected. Initial report also noted that learning materials were also damaged.

Briones herself visited the Valencia Central Elementary School and Pulangbato National High School in Valencia, Negros Oriental recently to check the affected school buildings and facilities.

She pointed out the resiliency and sturdiness of the Gabaldon School Building in Dauin Central School as it was able to withstand the strong winds and gustiness of the typhoon, which put the province under Storm Signal Number 4.

“We are practically working 24 hours a day.”

“There are many things that need to be done, and we are practically working 24 hours a day,” Briones stressed.

“So, we are doing the monitoring very carefully and practically on a day-to-day basis,” she concluded.

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